Romanian IT in San Francisco — official launch

Romanians working in IT in San Francisco met for the first time on February 5 as part of the Romanian IT local chapter. This the first step in building a global Romanian IT community, part of the project “IT without borders”, which aims to facilitate communication and collaboration among Romanians everywhere. We’re now over 20 people and looking forward to welcoming even more!

For the past 15 years, many Romanians have left their home country to work in IT in the Bay Area, so it was only natural to start the Romanian IT community here. Now they have access to a platform that can connect both locally and with Romanian IT specialists world wide to work on relevant projects and initiatives. This may very well be a solution to one of the biggest problems that Romania is facing — brain drain.

Read more here

Save the Date – Top 5 2017 Growth Conferences

We’re running out of 2016 and if you haven’t done it yet, it’s a good time to put some dates in the calendar for your personal development. Being a great growth manager means you have to be on top of your game with both marketing, business development, management and operations. And that’s beyond your company’s industry.

growth-managers

Every year, things evolve very fast, so even if you keep up with the news, you need to get a boost by going to at least 5 events. This will not only give you an edge when it comes to info and case studies, but it is also a great way to network with peers and develop professional relationships with likeminded individuals.

Startup Grind – Global Conference

WHEN – February 21-22
WHERE – Silicon Valley – Fox Theater | Redwood City

“These are our people” – Sam Altman, Y Combinator, plus with 3,000 founders and investors, more than 40 keynote and fireside sessions, and over 50 exhibiting startups, this is Startup Grind’s largest event ever.

GrowCo

WHEN – May 8-10
WHERE – New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Join like-minded entrepreneurs, business leaders, bestselling authors and headliners straight out of the pages of Inc., for three days of ideas, inspiration and insights, networking and learning, and proven strategies to help your company grow and thrive.

Traction Conference

WHEN – May 31 – June 1
WHERE – Vancouver, Canada

Traction brings founders and growth experts from tech unicorns including LinkedIn, Dropbox, Pinterest, Zillow, Hootsuite, Marketo, Groupon, HubSpot, AngelList and more to teach startups distribution strategies and tactics to get, keep and grow customers and revenue at scale.

CONTENT MARKETING WORLD CONFERENCE AND EXPO

WHEN – September 5-8
WHERE – Cleveland, Ohio USA, Huntington Convention Center of Cleveland

Over 80 sessions and workshops presented by the leading brand marketers from around the world covering strategy, integration, measurement

TechCrunch Disrupt 2017

WHEN – September
WHERE – San Francisco, California

It is the world’s leading authority in debuting revolutionary startups, introducing game-changing technologies and discussing what’s top of mind for the tech industry’s key innovators.

As 2017 kicks in and more conferences are announced, I’ll update this list with dates and places, so keep an eye out for this post.

What’s your shortlist for 2017?

Image Source

Secret Sauce #GrowthHacking book – the review of a preview

I recently got my hands on the free chapter of the Secret Sauce Growth Hacking guide. You can get it too here – secretsaucenow.com. In a nutshell, it’s a 14 pages walkthrough on how to get free press, whether you’re a startup or a more established company, but struggling to get your foot in the door with the media reps & journalists.

The chapter is well written and uses good examples and step-by-step sections where one can easily take the learning and apply it right away. Hell, I’m going to try it next week to see what happens, how fast I can get those couple of dozen media articles. I even have the right campaign in mind to do it. I bet you have one of those ideas, too, right now. But like me, you may be lacking the tools or the knowledge about the order or the approach which you need to take on to get noticed and published.

Even with my 10 years of digital marketing, growth hacking and PR experience in corporate, startup and agency environment, I was impressed with the big promise it starts with – the 1000s of journalists you can reach out to in a scalable way without risking to be a robot.

What you need to do to achieve this is to build that list of 1000s of websites (pay attention here, it’s websites, not contacts). Use the Chrome Scraper add-on for speed – it gets you directories. Cool, right? Ok, then once you have the list, then go to Buzzstream.com and push that list to get the contact details (magic!) and you are only left with the email and press kit to put together. Then you start mailing and replying to the ones interested.

Download the free chapter to find out exactly how to pitch and what to include in the press kit and please come back and tell me if it was worth your time.

Featured image source

The tables have turned: VC Pitches @ Money Talks #IFweek

Big turnout today at the Innovate Finance event at Level39, where entrepreneurs, FinTech enthusiasts, interested parties have come to see who and why is channeling money into finance innovation projects.

Of all the intros, I found Gerard Grech’s (Tech City UK) to be the most noteworthy, with him presenting the UK VC funding landscape: 20x increase since 2010, high growth segment on AIM.LSE, 42% of EU unicorns are in the UK, two 500 million + exits – Deepmind, Naturalmotion Games – to Google & Zynga. And that the Future Fifty program raised 22 rounds and 675 million in 16 months. Pretty impressive achievements given its relative short lifespan.

5 minute VC pitches

After the intro sessions, we moved on to the 5 minute pitch sessions by VC representatives, which was sort of a ‘turn the tables on the investors’ endeavor. The organizers made it very difficult for them by keeping a strict time check with personalized (and somewhat ridiculous) music that was turned on at the end of each pitch. Many entrepreneurs who participated in pitch events were happy to see their judges going through the same things as they did. Long story short, here’s a summary of what I deemed worthy of mentioning from each of the pitches:

Zach Tan at InfoComm (State-run Singapore initiative)

  • He’s here to promote the opportunities in SE Asia – middle class (consumer class) growth and wealth expansion
  • They are privatizing former public sector legacy service and infrastructure providers & expanding the e-commerce sector
  • UK has a natural mind-set advantage in SE Asia, thinking beyond the homeland
  • “American companies are like aircraft carriers, EU start-ups are like speedboats”, the waters may not be suitable for the first ones

Nicolas Sharp at Passion Capital (early stage tech VC)

  • Announced a 45 million fund, strategy similar with the first fund – small seed investments (invested 124 million in 42 companies at a valuation of over 400 million)
  • Invested in 10 companies last year out of 3000 they see
  • They claim to treat people really well and want to help
  • All numbers are public, the term sheet is one page plain English and used in 5 MBA classes

Michael Treskow at Accel Partners

  • 300+ investments, 30+ years’ experience
  • Invested all over the world (25 countries)
  • They focus on increasing the percentage of NON-US companies in the fin-tech sector

Mariano Belinky at Santander InnoVentures

  • They released a Fintech 2.0 paper with some key trends:
    • Smart data
    • Friction-less processes
    • Internet of Things in banking
    • Distributed Ledger (blockchain)
  • Entrepreneurs shouldn’t struggle with compliance and ma banking quirks
  • Santander’s OpenBank – .8 million customers, 5.5 billion in balance

Rob Moffat at Balderton Capital

  • YOOX and Betfair IPOs
  • European focused VC
  • Former Goldman Sachs and Google employees, a couple of entrepreneurs
  • Invested 4 million in Crowdcube

After all the pitches were over, we witnessed a feedback committee Q&A, withBill Simmons at Crowdcube – CFO, Nezahat Gultekin at Atlantic Bridge Capital (Senior adviser), Russ Shaw at Tech London Advocates (Founder), Louise Beaumont at GLI Finance (PA and Marketing), Alain Falys at Yoyo Wallet (Founder). This was a bit less structured and the VCs received further grilling from the Q&A guests. Again, I captured what I deemed worthy to remember.

  • VCs don’t see themselves as in competition, but in collaboration especially at early stage – seed / series A. More competition can be found at series B or larger rounds, when your graph goes hockey stick.
  • The entrepreneur needs to do the work, the VC needs to be the part time psychologist, mentor and financial stake provider, you want to partner with someone that has been in your field
  • The Chairperson that manages board relationships is crucial so that entrepreneurs can work together with investors
  • Risk & how VCs manage it: is this team right for now, 1 year time and 5 years’ time, cofounders and why they have chosen them, credibility of the founders
  • Metrics are crucial for Series B, preIPO stage
  • Check for the first questions that VCs ask, check for the personality fit, investment strategy, follow-up rounds, business understanding
  • Entrepreneurs need to ask more questions, grill the VCs more
  • Don’t build growth on high CPAs, but on technology investment focus and competitive CPAs to drive growth

Last but not least, what is an industry event without some predictions? Here’s a take at the opportunity in FinTech from the VC representatives:

  • Asia – payment, block chain
  • “Plumbing” – SaaS, IaaS – allow other companies to build on what you build
  • Frictionless data, IoT banking, Smart data (yes, that’s Santander)
  • Selling to financial institutions themselves
  • Insurance

Tutor @ The Alchemy Diploma of Digital Marketing – April 2015

Proud again to announce something cool that I am going to do this year in London. I’m going to put my Digital Marketing, MBA and Entrepreneurship skills & experience to good use mixed with the seasoned methodologies of the Digital Marketing Institute to create the space for Londoners to take the first steps in the digital world. Here’s the blog post I wrote for the class earlier in the week. Please feel free to share 🙂 And use the EARLY BIRD code when registering.

Update 6/3/2015: Supersaver code expired, please use Saver 🙂

Update: 24/3/2015: The Saver code is gone now!

alchemyclass

We believe in giving before taking, so here are our 10 key digital marketing tips that will help you build amazing campaigns using the best digital mix.

1. Be helpful, honest and open – the rise of the internet & mobile connections have brought people closer together & closer to brands. It’s now more important than ever to stand out with a helpful message. Give before you ask.

2. Write for your customers, not for Google – too much we have focused on keywords and link-building for search engine optimization and forgot about the power of digital PR, organic mentions and fresh content.

3. The click is just the beginning of the journey – use today’s wide variety of pay per click networks, but don’t forget to track your customer all the way from the banner/link ad to your thank you page. You will learn a lot.

4. Email is king – if used correctly, email is still a very powerful tool, even with the rise of social media. Gets people clicking and gets people buying. What would you do without all those travel deals, Timeout offers or cool discounts that you get every day?

5. Display advertising enriches brands – pictures are worth 1000 words, especially in display advertising. Show what’s great about your product of service, make people smile, laugh or go “aha” with that design and copy. Clicking isn’t everything here.

6. Use that mobile connection wisely – our (smart)phone is the most intimate communication tool of them all. We carry it around with us every day and use it regularly. Do everyone a favour and don’t be intrusive. Connect with a purpose and add value.

7. Measure everything – the internet was a big leap forward from the TV or print ads because we now can track each and every marketing tactic. So we know what works and what doesn’t and focus just on the stuff that works. Analytics tools have to be part of every digital mix, no matter how small.

8. Social media is about being social – Don’t just start a social media channel to broadcast, use it to connect and engage with your customers, answer their questions, post useful content and entertain them. Oh, and use photos and videos a lot, it works.

9. Not all social networks are useful for your business – or for yourself for that matter. Learn how to choose from the wide range of networks and go where you can best provide added value and reach your customers at the same time. I know, a tricky one.

10. The strategy pulls it all together – the mix of tools is not a campaign unless we make strategic choices and establish a clear path, a tone of voice, narrative, approach, network mix and a set of indicators that will tell if we are successful or not. Never start a digital marketing effort without a strategy. You’ll never know if you are successful.

This is just a 5 minute taster of a 10 module Professional Diploma in Digital Marketing, an accredited course we are running this spring in London. Just to give you an idea of its scale, over 9,000 professionals from 36 countries have graduated and taken enhanced digital knowledge back to their businesses. So why not join them in April?

We have two types of classes, both full time and part time, run by two experienced tutors, Mike and myself.

Startcelerate London – test your startup in a 2 day marathon

Last week I was talking to some of my Romanian friends in the UK and one of them introduced me to Startcelerate London, a pitch & match event that will take place at Level39 (great Canary Wharf co-working space) in the October 31 – November 1st weekend.

I said it before on my blog, Romania is one of the rising stars in tech thanks to high quality programmers, a still emerging market in terms of costs and very high Internet speeds. Thus, Romanians have decided to come to London and provide great programming and product development services to 20 eligible startups.

20 startups and up to 10 tech companies to pitch one another, get essential insights from renowned industry specialists and engage in a close matching process out of which investment partnerships can result. It’s not about money investments, but about direct investments of tech resources from strong established software companies into promising startups in exchange for equity.

How to participate as a STARTUP?
A technology partner can be the essential element in developing your startup, allowing you to build or scale your technology and team. Apply here be one of the 20 selected startups for pitching in front of 10 strong tech companies and get a resource investment from one of them. If your project is selected you will have to buy a ticket for the event in order to finally confirm your presence for the event. You will receive a link with the ticket information in the confirmation email.

Who are the sponsors (direct resource investment, remember?)

investors pitch

As this was not reason enough, the organizers have prepared a list of speakers to share their knowledge and inspire the participants into building the best products ever. They are:

John Spindler, Enterprise Capital
John Spindler is the CEO of Capital Enterprise and Founder of Capital List. John has several years of experience with early stage businesses both as a founder, investor and an advisor. The last few years he has focused on supporting startups in the investment process and has successfully helped startups raise finance through introductions to accelerators, angels and venture capital. John is an invaluable resource for startups looking for advice in the investment process.

Thilo Schneider, Pinset Masons
Thilo is a corporate lawyer with Pinsent Masons LLP, an international law firm specialising in the technology sector (www.pinsentmasons.com). Thilo is head of the firm’s Bootlaw (www.bootlaw.com) initiative which runs monthly events aimed at tech start-ups and his firm regularly advises emerging tech companies and their investors on corporate, IP and other legal issues.

Jaspar Roos, Future Ideas
Jaspar is a renowned authority in the field of innovation. Jaspar has been the Chief Inspiration Officer for ABN AMRO Bank for many years. Managing the innovation and venturing lab Dialogues Incubator, Jaspar has been one of the pioneers in themes as wearable technology and crowdfunding. Currently, he is entrepreneur, writer and inspirer. His main outlets are www.futureideas.eu, www.chiefhumorofficer.com, www.ventur.es and XL Family. He loves life.

Bill Morrow, Angel’s Den
Bill is CEO & Co-Founder of Angels Den, Europe and Asia’s largest angel network with an established equity crowdfunding platform. Since founding Angels Den in 2007, he has changed the rules on angel investing and led the way in making investment truly accessible to great businesses.Bill has run businesses in London, Hong Kong, Singapore, New York, Russia and Dubai. He is a popular keynote speaker who inspires his audiences with his open approach and determination to promote angel investing and crowdfunding and make business finance more accessible for all.

Josh Krysiak, Citinite
Founder of Citinite, a digital marketing startup for the nightlife sector. While completing a Law degree at UCL and the University of Hong Kong, Josh gained extensive experience in the entertainment industry, from managing stages at festivals to organising, promoting and playing at events on multiple continents. Building on this expertise, he spearheaded the development of the Citinite platform in order to fill the gap in the market for a comprehensive and targeted promotion solution.

Update #1:

Two Pitch & Match events were held already in Romania, Cluj and Bucharest, both validating the event structure, the internal team efficiency and the need for this kind of alternative founding of the market. Specific to Startcelerate’s investment process is a bespoke convertible security that simplifies the negotiation, prevents premature valuation, and covers specific risks.

Update #2:

They’ve added new sponsors and partners for the event and prolonged the application deadline until the 26th of October.

UCL Advances(the entrepreneurial wing of UCL), Level39 (the Tech Accelerator in Canary Wharf), London & Partners (representing the Mayor of London and TechCity), Pinset Masons, Thomas Eggar LLT, F6s (the biggest network of startups and investors in the world) or DotForge (a strong accelerator specialized in tech and social).

Last but not least, some useful links about Startcelerate:

Video of Startcelerate concept
Video with highlights of Bucharest event

The Pitch&Match London Event Overview presentation
The Startcelerate Concept presentation
The Executive Summary & Sponsorship packs presentation

How to use moral psychology to grow a community around your startup

A few weeks ago, Gus Ferguson sent out an email with a call for workshops for the Digital Growth Day (18th of September) at Google Campus London. On any other occasion, I would have gone forward with a regular topic like: “How to leverage social media to attract customers”, “Increase your digital footprint and generate awareness, responses and sales”, “Turn your likes, shares, tweets into real paying customers” and so on.

But no.

This time I had just finished reading The Righteous Mind, a book by Jonathan Haidt, where he uses moral psychology to show how politicians can become more appealing to their constituents, but at the same time lays the ground for an interesting paradigm that can be used in consumer marketing (both for corporations and startups). That’s how I ended up emailing the topic of:

How moral psychology and digital marketing can accelerate your customer acquisition – a talk about messaging and leveraging the inner moral structures to strengthen and grow the community around a start-up

Digital-Growth-Day-Agenda-banner

I’m not going to spoil the workshop itself by revealing it on my blog, but I can tell you this. If you subscribe here (it’s FREE) and be selected as one of the 12 participants, you’ll get to see me:

  • talk about myself for a bit 🙂
  •  giving you a test on the moral foundations
  • talking about ideology and creating groups around your startups and products
  • focusing more on community and on the outside than on the founder(s) and team(s)
  • showcasing some of the more successful messages and decode their moral substance

All that and a bag of M&Ms for the most relevant contribution of them all. So join me next Thursday, looking forward to it.

Update:

And here’s the presentation that I used to make my point:

Digital Innovation Meetup Summary @ Google Campus

10387893_671776802916594_1790564367_nI like to publish a summary of my observations and learning after the digital events I attend, even if the event ended a week ago, but it’s vacation season (still!), so bear with me. This one will make no exception, but in addition to my own notes, I used James Ashcroft‘s ones since I was late for the first presentation, getting there just when the Q&A started. Anyway, we had a 3 speaker event with hugely different styles and topics that we could learn from.

The first presentation, the one from Lief Bode Nielsen, Senior eCommerce Specialist at LEGO, is the one that I missed. But here are James’s notes.

· Innovation is critical to the sustained success of LEGO – 60% of toys we sell each year did not exist the year before – and digital innovation is one of the four pillars on which our continued success is built.
· The success of the LEGO movie and the company’s video games past and present is well known but we are also integrating digital into the physical. An excellent recent example is Lego Fusion. We’ve done away with instruction books, you begin by downloading an app and, in the Town Master version for example, you are the mayor charged with building a town. The premise isn’t so different from, say, Sim City, but here you design and build each building using physical bricks. You then take a picture of the building and your creation gets digitised into the game!
· LEGO is also leveraging Augmented Reality in flagship stores. Children bring a box of LEGO up to a screen and it animates the bricks to show the kids what the product will look like once put together.
· LEGO has been using Optimal Sort (http://www.optimalworkshop.com/optimalsort.htm?gclid=CLvKm_rQocACFfMZtAodvnUA3A) to get consumers to help them better organise content online in a bid to realise next generation e-commerce.
· Since 2008 LEGO has been engaging consumers to crowdsource new ideas for its products.

And here are my thoughts from the Q&A: It’s always good to hear that a retail giant acknowledges that the industry has changed and they are adapting and moving forward with branded games (something that I had been an ambassador of since 2010) and e-commerce. It’s a mixture between brick and mortar and online, but the experience of getting into a toy store is still un-match-able. Just wait for more augmented reality innovations and practical use of currently available technologies. But back to Lego. Their site is viewed as the flagship store and they keep rejuvenating their products with Evergreens and in and outs to keep the lines fresh – some years they have pirates, others not, on one hand, while on the other, there are some product lines that stay there for years.

An inside info: they were poached of their VP Marketing, so not even a stellar company such as Lego is safe from such practices. Keep your best people happy.

Next up and with a totally different approach, we had the chance to listen to Michael Abrey-Bugg, Commercial Relationship Manager at Age UK. His presentation was PowerPoint-less, but his examples and experience were very interesting to take in. They (AGE UK) provide services for elder, it’s a charity. However, they raise money through selling products and services to 1.2 mil. shoppers via 440 shops, B2B and online. He talked about installing smart meters to elderly people. Now that was a challenge! They used direct marketing in partnership with EON, sending out messages to 500,000 customers, with a 30% response rate and ended up installing 4,000 meters (a free service offered by EON through AGE UK).

People took to the benefits of smart meters like removing the need for workers to visit their homes to take meter readings and the price certainty achieved by removing estimated bills. He said that smart meters would also facilitate remote switching, allowing customers to have gas/electricity supplied by EON in the morning and British Gas in the evening, for example, or whichever combination gets consumers the best rate.

Besides the transparency and convenience, their studies showed that 8/10 liked the smart energy displays, but even though the contracts said that customers own the data and that then gets transferred to energy companies, there were still major concerns about personal data privacy – some saying that it would be easy for a hacker to tap in and see if they are on vacation or not.

One of my main aha-moments: There is an opportunity for an electricity and gas real-time bidding and switching marketplace.

Last one to present was Max Kreijn, Digital Strategist at Open Activation. Open Activation is a digital innovation methodology that helps large enterprises to successfully embrace and disrupt digital like a technology start-up. It’s like the business model canvas, but for corporations. He’s giving away a whitepaper on his website, called 7 Key findings (check the spam folder). The findings themselves are not head turners, but the cases behind them are worth reading – Car2Go, SemCo, Aribnb vs. Hilton, Runkeeper, Instagram and Coca Cola. Max would welcome approaches from people interested in piloting Open Activation, so he was trying out a sales pitch in front of us. Sorry to say that he still needs to work on that, as I was not really impressed. The whitepaper however is a good read.

That’s pretty much what I managed to take away from the event. The internet of things is being adopted by elderly people, too, retail is more and more synonymous with digital and e-commerce and corporations need to turn into start-ups to grow.

Digital emotions processing & a new start-up program by Paypal

We struggle to better ourselves, to understand more how emotions, personality traits and other characteristics influence the way we shop, do business and interact. It’s not only useful to better understand our own reactions, but also for companies that rely on predicting a positive or negative behavior based on past experiences, likes, dislikes and attitudes towards certain events or political doctrines.

Some go to the extent to which they manipulate what their users see, as Facebook did in January 2012 (paywall), while others have other, less intrusive approaches. The less intrusive approach is, of course, much preferred and it can rule out any government investigations, as in the case of Facebook, due to consent issues. But let’s go back to the three examples that I’ve seen at the Minibar Meetup last week.

Digital emotions processing

It’s somehow ironic how a lifeless, emotionless computer can be taught to read and process our emotions. Some may argue that this is the sure path to androids and to robots taking over the world, manipulating our thoughts and forcing us to make decisions in their favor. I have a less apocalyptic view of the fact and these three companies, their business models and their customers confirm my judgement.

So there’s VisualDNA, who combines psychological testing with big data analysis. For ordinary people, this means that they help them understand themselves better. For businesses, they contribute to a better understanding of customer behavior. Their main revenue stream comes from selling data and, what I found to be the most interesting, a new way of calculating credit risk by examining the psychological profile. Mastercard has already paid for this product and they made no effort to hide that in their presentation.

And there’s Position Dial, a site that helps you explore where you stand on the issues you care about – and matches you with politicians and brands who act in line with your position. They also show you the different sides of every story: left, right and beyond, to help you make your own mind up fast. They have no revenue stream right now, but seem to be built on social stereotypes and labels and might be useful for political & social awareness campaigns. Their presentation was rather dull, but the product is interesting if you give it a second thought.

The last ones were the worst, if you take just their presentation into consideration. Crowd Emotion was the most interesting product showcased that evening. They use video technology to detect emotions via the facial expression captured from people all over the world. This can be culturally challenging, but they are expanding the comparison base to make the software even more accurate. They make money by selling video hours processed by their platform and have a huge applicability potential in customer service, interactive POS advertising, customer satisfaction, but also in clinical conditions – psychologist and psychiatrists can better analyze patient data and share results with their peers.

The world will become more creepily predictable once these type of businesses become the norm in advertising, market research, healthcare and so on.

Paypal’s new startup program

10454162_322994451188717_696182360_n

They were the sponsors of the entire Minibar Meetup, so they held their presentation first. The Blueprint Program that they have in place for startups can mainly be accessed through accelerators, but they also allow direct applications for select companies. You would think that just by providing free transactions up to 50k would be enough, but no. They went a step further and added customer service support and mentoring with their development teams as an extra benefit to the entire scheme.

So if you think your startup might benefit from it, here are the eligibility criteria:

  • IT&C company with a focus of e/m-offline-commerce
  • privately held
  • have a Paypal account and have not breached ToS
  • you have not applied before

Found out at London’s Silicon Roundabout – Not another LinkedIn Game & other cool stuff

Went to a Silicon Roundabout last evening, just on Southbank. We were warmly hosted by the Iris Nursery, who just told us they are open to ideas and love to support startups and then let us network the hell out of the rest of the evening.

I’ve been to some meetups already in London – social media, digital marketing, innovation ones – but this was the one I found most like-minded people in. Works best if you go there open-minded, looking to find out what others do, not just to promote your stuff. By the way, it’s also useful to have a 30 second description of who you are and what you do, so you don’t stumble when people come over and introduce themselves.

photo (1)

Anyway, moving on to the topic in the title, by far, the most interesting thing I found at the Roundabout was the fact that you can play games with your Linkedin Account. With Beat the Buzzword (*made by these guys), you compete against your connections and try to guess as many buzzwords as you can. It’s a simple trivia game, but it’s part of the efforts to make Linkedin more social and more engaging, a thing they are trying to achieve also with the Linkedin Posts initiative. It’s not the first game attempt that you can connect with you Linkedin Account to, we’ve seen the DropIn, a crappy Tetris with your connection’s profile pictures (creepy). Try both, at least you’ll have a laugh.

Apart from this, I was also impressed to find out more about the latest and the greatest in the world of coding. It’s not just the social media experts that are feeling left out and obsolete, or the market research analysts or the web designers, it’s also the programmers. With tools like Firebase, Angular.js, Node.js or Boostrap.js, almost anyone can learn how to code really easily without writing thousands of lines for simple tasks. But looking at the tools and the level of complexity you have to go through to develop something useful, I believe coders still have a long way to go 🙂