The value of an MBA, from a graduate perspective

Every now and then, there’s an article out there that goes viral about how MBAs are losing their shine. This time it was Harvard Business School that got 4.5% less applicants

With this type of news, you’ll see a plethora of experts, consultants and self-help gurus, along with all the self-made people on LinkedIn and elsewhere proclaim that, alas, the MBA is a waste of money. Then the comments follow, with some testimonies of how worthless the degree is, sometimes coming from people who never took a class after graduating from university. What I find interesting about them is the fact that they try to transfer their own experience and generalize. 

I’ll do the exact opposite. I’ll share why the MBA was a valuable experience for someone that was born in a 150,000 people town in northwestern Romania and is now working in San Francisco on one of the most important problems of humanity – identity. 

Program: Hult International Business School – Executive MBA – London Campus, graduated in 2014, US degree

This is what I wrote in one of the LinkedIn threads, as a comment. For me it was a huge boost, all the way into high tech, both in the UK and the US, after being born and raised in Eastern Europe with no tech background. If you don’t know why you’re doing it, it’s going to be a waste of time and money. If you do, it’ll be the best investment you’ll ever make. Still pays dividends.

I majored in international business, with a focus on marketplaces. I commuted for 2 years from Bucharest, Romania to London. The MBA helped me grow outside of Romania and after about 1 year landed a Country Manager position in London in FinTech. Then, a year later, I moved to the United States and became the Growth Manager (Marketing and BD) for an Artificial Intelligence company.

The MBA gave me huge confidence boosts, exposed me to 120 different people from 36 different nationalities, some of which had more experience than I had in years.

It created lifelong friendships – just visited a former colleague in Barcelona for a mini-reunion and his b-day.

It also taught me to think bigger and trust my skills knowledge in a way it would have taken me years to do without it. Sure, the knowhow is great, I understand how to analyze a company, how to invest. But the human factor definitely plays more of a central role than other parts.

All in all, totally worth it.

p.s. I’m reading this book by Robert Heller – The Unlikely Governor: An American Immigrant’s Journey from Wartime Germany to the Federal Reserve Board. Very connected to my story, minus the war. We’re privileged to live in peaceful times (in some parts of the world)

Of all things, local British Pounds carry lessons for crypto and the circular economy

If you’re wondering what a local British Pound is, you’re not alone. I was like that too, before my friend pointed them out to me. After a little more research, I found that these are called complementary currencies and they are by no means new or rare. Just peculiar. Here’s what they actually are:

A “complementary” currency is a type of quasi-monetary exchange medium that is intended to function as a complement to (rather than an alternative to) standard national currencies. (Costanza, Robert et al., “Complementary Currencies as a Method to Improve Local Sustainable Economic Welfare”, University of Vermont, Draft, 12 December 2003.)

For those who still don’t understand what they are, complementary currencies are like baseball cards or game tokens. They are valuable and tradable in certain mediums and within a certain group – be it interest-based or medium-based. If you try and trade them outside of the system, they are not valuable, but can be converted to more traditional currency, when in contact with the right buyer.

In some case, the buyer can be the issuing authority, in others it can be another community member or someone who would like to gain access to the community and would like to pay their way in.

In 2004, according to the same source I quoted the definition from, there were about 500 complementary currencies in circulation and historically there have been about 4000 issued to that date. If they were to redo the study today, they would find that cryptocurrencies and tokens fit this description to a large extent.

These complementary currencies have the following interesting and relevant characteristics to the blockchain world:

  • Convertibility: while they are sometimes tradable for national currency (fiat), this exposes them to the risk of run on the bank, but this feature increases adoption.
  • Commodity-backed: increases security, but reduces participation due to lack of convertibility.
  • Acceptance: it is increased if people can buy goods and services they need with the said currency – like taxes, food, beverages, rent etc. Pretty much like the circular economy I described in an earlier post.
  • Operational costs: some of these currencies carry a fee for the issuer, to cover operational costs, like printing and securing, network operations etc.
  • Taxing: here some have been deemed taxable, some not, by design. Up to each state and community to decide.

 

Complementary currencies were introduced as a means of storing and increasing the value and wealth of a certain community. This resembles what the crypto community is trying to achieve with utility tokens and it struck me that not once have I heard a comparison of this system to what ICOs / Token Sales are trying to achieve. While there is less geographical limitation today, compared to the attempts in previous centuries, the abstract characteristics of the currencies remain surprisingly similar.

What’s even more surprising is the lack of information at the very top of political decision making, where no lobbyists or politicians have compared crypto to these complementary currencies. They have chosen, consciously or unconsciously, to see them as competing currencies, not as complementary. That presumably makes them an easier target for stronger regulations.

Both cryptocurrencies and complementary currencies as a greater category face the following barriers for adoption:

  1. Lack of acceptance (catch 22)
  2. Lack of credibility (issuer)
  3. High transaction costs (issuer)
  4. Unsustainable operational cost (issuer / community)

 

The problems we’re facing in the crypto world today are not new. We just have to read more, understand more and find precedents where others made it work, show them to the world, apply them and use them in conversations with the ever-present nay-sayers.

I’ll leave you at the end with this study on British local pounds.

Breaking into Blockchain – Crypto 101

Breaking into blockchain is not hard, but requires some time invested in learning about the basics. I personally started by reading white papers – namely, Ethereum, Bitcoin, Dash, and tons and tons of ICOs. Of course, if you know mathematics, polynomes and cryptography, you’re already 3-4 steps ahead of the game and can understand the probabilistic models better than everyone else.

Here’s two of the best resources when it comes to taking the first steps into blockchain – collection by A16Z, bitcoin-focused link list by James Lopp. These two alone will get you far enough to begin with. From there you’re going to branch out into the wild and discover your favorite coins/algorithms/programs, whatever you understand and makes sense for you. There’s no right or wrong at this stage, mostly trials and scams.

Since I already mentioned I’m a big fan of Ethereum, here’s a link to a collection of applications build to top of this ecosystem. Mostly wallets, trading, gambling, games, just like any early stage medium and just 240ish. The internet started like this, too. It will eventually grow beyond this. After all, you need to build the foundation, lay the piping, create the structure before you can start operating the mall. I don’t know why I chose the mall analogy, but it fits the context very well. It evolved from the street market into the steel and stone edifices we find everywhere nowadays.

You need to keep up to date and if you don’t want to get all the newsletters from Coindesk, CCN, Bitcoin Magazine etc, then it’s easier just to follow Crypto Panic. It will aggregate the best news for you, along with community signals. Sure, there’s bias, but where isn’t one? Do your own research, don’t follow the shillers or the FUD (fear uncertainty doubt) spreaders or the FOMO peddler (I won’t explain FOMO).

Ok, you did the reading, time to grab some coins. Here’s a few lists of exchanges. Do your own research and choose the ones that make sense for your needs/strategy: Crypto to Crypto exchanges (I mostly use Bittrex and Binance); Fiat to Crypto Exchanges (Coinbase and Gemini are my favs here).

Now you have the coins, but where to store them? Definitely not in exchanges, as you won’t be able to do much with them there. I use a few wallet combinations, like Scatter, Metamask (protect your private keys), MyEtherWallet, Blockchain Info, Jaxx, Coinomi and several others that are coin-specific. Make sure you check the HTTPS, the URL and bookmark your wallets. Phishing is very common.

Lastly, for those who want to dive deeper into ICOs, here’s a primer along with the Price Waterhouse Cooper new global ICO guide, hot off the press from Switzerland.

Remember, it’s still early days, so the tools will be pretty rudimentary, but as the industry matures, the tools will too. Right now we don’t know what are the best ways to do things because we don’t know what are the best things we can do yet with blockchain technology. That’s enough to excite a lot of people out there to build, test, launch, fail, learn, build, rinse and repeat.

Cryptocurrencies – towards a circular economy

“A local currency is used within a defined area and promotes demand for local goods and services. A multiplier effect occurs as the service or goods provider in turn spends the funds locally, with each reuse strengthening the system, promoting local value, self-sufficiency and community interdependence, while providing independence from financial systems far from local control and benefit.
(…) The use of local currencies increases in times of recession or depression as we saw internationally after the banking crisis of 2008. Local currencies exist around the world in many different forms, with the common denominator being the intent to strengthen the local system, building in resilience, minimising waste and enhancing rather than diluting local productivity.” (The Guardian, 2015)

I’m anchoring the circular economy to its currency meaning and show how both the Euro and cryptocurrencies share the same adoption, growth and stability cycles. Few remember that the Euro was established in 1999 as a virtual currency first and only in 2002 did it become a printed / minted physical currency. Beginning on 1 January 1999, all bonds and other forms of government debt by eurozone nations were denominated in euros and all participating economies pegged their local currencies to the Euro, becoming subdivisions.

Kind of like an ICO, right? The ICO organizer sets a price and fixes all other crypto rates to the new currency, then distributes the new currency to be used in the local economy they are, supposedly, creating. I say supposedly because not all ICOs aim to create economies and those who don’t and aren’t a security are most likely scams / shitcoins.

The euro grew in importance steadily, with its share of foreign exchange reserves rising from nearly 18% in 1999 to 25% in 2003 – while the dollar share fell by an equivalent margin.” (source)

The biggest turning point for the Euro was when a part of the circulating supply was locked as foreign exchange reserves and that share increased, replacing some of the dollar share of reserves, sending the dollar value down and the euro value up.

But back to the circular economy component — if you just have the above decisions and adoption, including forex reserves, then your economy still risks having to use external resources more than internal ones and devalue the local currency by oversupply.

Let me create an example here – fiat with fiat.

People in your local economy consume a lot of wheat, and that wheat is imported from US. They pay for it in Euros, but those Euros get converted in USD so that the wheat producer can pay salaries, bills and other expenses in the US, where USD is legal tender. Once the wheat producer has sold the Euros they received and got dollars in return, the total supply of Euros has increased, while demand has stayed the same. This drives the price of EUR-USD down, which means you can buy more Euros with the same dollar amount.

How can you stop this? You produce wheat in the Eurozone and consume it there. Let’s see what happens if you do that. Your people buy wheat from the wheat producer inside the Eurozone with EUR, the wheat producer pays for their cost of doing business with EUR, so there is really no change in supply or demand for EUR versus other currencies. A potential consequence for this might be even a reduction of supply or increased demand of EUR, as there is less EUR available for foreign exchange, therefore driving the EUR-USD and other pairs up – meaning for every dollar, you can buy less and less EUR. And that’s a good thing for the Eurozone, it increases the value of their currency and economy.

If you go a step further and produce goods and services beyond what your people can consume and based on external demand, then the supply reduction / demand increase of your currency is accelerated. Let’s use the wheat example again. If the wheat producers of the Eurozone satisfy all the wheat demand locally and have surplus they export to other countries, let’s say Russia, so we can use the ruble, then there are goods flowing out of the zone. The wheat is paid for in Ruble and the local wheat producers exchanges those rubles for Euros, as they need local currency to pay salaries, bills and other expenses. The ruble drops, the Euro increases, so next time the same ton of wheat will be worth more rubles for the same euro amount. The supply of Euros decreases and the supply of ruble increases, making it more expensive to buy wheat from Eurozone countries.

I ended the story on that note to show that a circular economy without inflation is dangerous, as competing goods and services from other countries with inflation can become a better choice, even if yours are superior in quality, if the Euro becomes too expensive year after year. But then we enter the advanced realm of monetary policy, competing systems and that’s beyond the scope of what I’m addressing today.

Back to cryptocurrency, though, and the point I want to make. If you replace Euro with Monero, for example, you get the following story:

People in your local economy consume a lot of wheat, and that wheat is imported from US. They pay for it in Monero, but those Monero get converted in USD so that the wheat producer can pay salaries, bills and other expenses in the US, where USD is legal tender. Once the wheat producer has sold the Monero they received and got dollars in return, the total supply of Monero has increased, while demand has stayed the same. This drives the price of XMR-USD down, which means you can buy more Moneros with the same dollar amount.

How can you stop this? You produce wheat in the Monero community and consume it there. Let’s see what happens if you do that. Your people buy wheat from the wheat producer inside the community with Monero, the wheat producer pays for their cost of doing business with Monero, so there is really no change in supply or demand for Monero versus other currencies. A potential consequence for this might be even a reduction of supply or increased demand of Monero, as there is less Monero available for foreign exchange, therefore driving the XMR-USD and other pairs up – meaning for every dollar, you can buy less and less Monero. And that’s a good thing for the Monero community, it increases the value of their currency and economy.

If you go a step further and produce goods and services beyond what your people can consume and based on external demand, then the supply reduction / demand increase of your currency is accelerated. Let’s use the wheat example again. If the wheat producers of the Monero community satisfy all the wheat demand locally and have surplus they export to other countries, let’s say Russia, so we can use the ruble, then there are goods flowing out of the zone. The wheat is paid for in Ruble and the local wheat producers exchanges those Rubles for Monero, as they need local currency to pay salaries, bills and other expenses. The ruble drops, the Monero increases, so next time the same ton of wheat will be worth more rubles for the same Monero amount. The supply of Monero decreases and the supply of ruble increases, making it more expensive to buy wheat from Monero community members.

Let’s go a step further and remove all fiat from the story. Here’s how it sounds now:

People in your local economy consume a lot of wheat, and that wheat is imported from the Bitcoin community. They pay for it in Monero, but those Monero get converted in Bitcoin so that the wheat producer can pay salaries, bills and other expenses in the Bitcoin community, where BTC is considered tender. Once the wheat producer has sold the Monero they received and got Bitcoin in return, the total supply of Monero has increased, while demand has stayed the same. This drives the price of XMR-BTC down, which means you can buy more Monero with the same Bitcoin amount.

How can you stop this? You produce wheat in the Monero community and consume it there. Let’s see what happens if you do that. Your people buy wheat from the wheat producer inside the community with Monero, the wheat producer pays for their cost of doing business with Moner, so there is really no change in supply or demand for Monero versus other currencies. A potential consequence for this might be even a reduction of supply or increased demand of Monero, as there is less Monero available for foreign exchange, therefore driving the XMR-BTC and other pairs up – meaning for every Bitcoin, you can buy less and less Monero. And that’s a good thing for the Monero community, it increases the value of their currency and economy.

If you go a step further and produce goods and services beyond what your people can consume and based on external demand, then the supply reduction / demand increase of your currency is accelerated. Let’s use the wheat example again. If the wheat producers of the Monero community satisfy all the wheat demand locally and have surplus they export to other countries, let’s say the ZCash community, so we can use the Zcash, then there are goods flowing out of the zone. The wheat is paid for in Zcash and the local wheat producers exchanges those ZEC for Monero, as they need local currency to pay salaries, bills and other expenses. The ZEC drops, the Monero increases, so next time the same ton of wheat will be worth more ZEC for the same Monero amount. The supply of Monero decreases and the supply of ZEC increases, making it more expensive to buy wheat from Monero community members.

Cryptocurrencies are no different from classic currencies, unless we invent new ways of using them in our economies. In capitalism, the system I just described above applies and will separate the winning cryptos from the losing ones long term. The ones who are able to circularly produce and spend and attract external resources in will win, while the other ones, producing less, will owe more and more and their currency will be worth less and less, until it eventually disappears and they adopt the next ruling currency.

Dear Youtube Product people, your Live sucks for webinars

Every now and then, I need a reminder that if you’re not paying for something, you’re likely the product.

Today, I had the pleasure of getting that reminder from Google, through its more horrible product, Youtube Live / Hangout on Air as a webinar tool (credits to this article for the photo below).

Google Hangout On Air Webinar

Here’s the backstory

I was organizing a webinar with my team that was supposed to go live today. We had registrations, people were looking forward to our content. But we failed to go live because of a button that wouldn’t load in Hangouts on Air. We had tested the Live functionality thoroughly in the previous two days, with an internal test and a full dry run with all participants the day before. The morning of, scripts in hand, decks ready, we signed on and were ready to go. As we saw the clock strike 10am Pacific, the Hangouts On Air stayed, ironically, Off Air. No matter what we did to it, it wouldn’t go live. After more than 20 minutes of struggles, we abandoned and had to reschedule. Fail, thanks, Google!

Given that it is a free product, I’m going to provide some free feedback here for the product people responsible for this terribly designed functionality.

  • Why do you even need encoders for the live video stream? Isn’t the Hangouts functionality enough?
  • Why don’t you have a consistent experience when using Hangouts on Air? Sometimes you see the Go On Air Button, sometimes you don’t
  • Improve that FAQ section that has confusing references
  • When choosing quick vs custom, you should never see encoding details
  • Why doesn’t the webinar automatically go live at the selected event date? Did someone forgot to code that functionality?
  • If you are serious about this product, have you considered adding paid technical support for companies to use it as a business tool? I know it works for kids doing stupid stuff live from their living rooms, but others are tired of old, clunky interfaces from other webinar platforms and would gladly pay per use
  • You need a better integration with Google Docs / Slides / Sheets – presenting in full screen and seeing what’s going on in the webinar requires two people, due to the fact that the slides take up the whole screen and the Hangout on Air controls are not visible

Let me know if you had similar issues with the product, maybe we can start a petition or something to get their attention.

Diversity in Silicon Valley

Before I moved here, the image I had about Silicon Valley was all about technology, new groundbreaking ideas, products and services and so many startups popping up everyday. Additionally, everyone was  talking about the “war for talent” and all the efforts companies are putting into having a more diverse workforce.

Following some basic reasoning, I thought there would be many opportunities for me as a recruiter. Of course, in my naivete, I completely forgot I was a woman from Romania. And so I was taken by surprise by a closed bro culture. Get a taste of it over here and here. I quickly learned how important networking and intros are – particularly for getting a job.

For the first few interviews the so-called feedback was the same – “you haven’t been for long enough in the Bay Area”. I was so lucky to get this type of constructive feedback that anyone can only hope for; it was clearly something I can improve and build on.

I found a community(?) called The Expat Woman – the name is self-explanatory. They organize events on career change, moving to the Bay Area. I thought it was exactly what I needed – to meet other women who are going through the same thing as I was, see what challenges they had and learn from them and how they managed to overcome those challenges.

The event was boldly called Careers in Tech: Recruiter Panel, Career Fair and Mixer. I already knew there was no way in hell so many things could go as planned and make a good coherent event but I went anyway with an open mind; I was in my “let’s explore” mood.

The setup of the room had no space for networking, everyone was sitting down quietly in their chairs, waiting for class to start – sorry – the event. I’m not even going to go into the organizing of the event, kudos for the ones who tried.

The main thing that bothered me was that all the panelists were American white male. At an event organized by The Expat Woman. Which was supposed to help WOMEN deal with the closed bro network.

Initially I thought – Wow, some insider information! from the bros themselves. But that was not the case.

The moderator started the discussion by proudly saying that only 20% of jobs are advertised. After the first few questions I started drifting off. I guess I’m allergic to BS. To put it simply it was an entire event where networking was mansplained.

The question of diversity somehow came up – all the panelists admitted they don’t do much in that direction. But they also proudly said they reject over 50% of their candidates based on “culture fit”. When asked how do they test for culture fit, well the answers started to go in another direction, gracefully avoiding the question.

At the same time, this notion of war for talent still exists. Still, some people in hiring management positions believe that all the good ones are taken and the ones who applied are not good enough to be reviewed – the way is aggressive sourcing and poaching employees from competitors. 

I left the event feeling frustrated because a) it was not what the event promised, b) there was no added value for me, c) it confirmed all the things I didn’t want to believe were true (bias on all levels). But most importantly, I felt conflicted. How can I ever be a “culture fit” in this type of environment? Do I even want to be a “culture fit”? I’m a recruiter, does that mean I should be like them to get a job around here? 

My main takeaway was – If I would have been born here, a boy and also white, everything would have been so much easier! How do I implement this in my day-to-day life as a woman in the Bay Area? Good question.

Since I obviously cannot be any of the above (nor want to), the only thing I decided to do is to stay away from these companies who show this type of toxic culture. I know that narrows the list of eligible companies but at least now I know for sure what I am not willing to compromise – and that is my identity.

We as recruiters, as candidates, as hiring managers, we have a lot of work to do, like maybe using the best talent to keep your startup alive and make those millions, not only promise them to investors. Stop thinking that person doesn’t look, think or feel like you. That’s a good thing!

It’s time to grow up, Silicon Valley!

 

If you have any similar situations you’d like to share, get in touch on Twitter @helenofpanda.

 

Romanian IT in San Francisco — official launch

Romanians working in IT in San Francisco met for the first time on February 5 as part of the Romanian IT local chapter. This the first step in building a global Romanian IT community, part of the project “IT without borders”, which aims to facilitate communication and collaboration among Romanians everywhere. We’re now over 20 people and looking forward to welcoming even more!

For the past 15 years, many Romanians have left their home country to work in IT in the Bay Area, so it was only natural to start the Romanian IT community here. Now they have access to a platform that can connect both locally and with Romanian IT specialists world wide to work on relevant projects and initiatives. This may very well be a solution to one of the biggest problems that Romania is facing — brain drain.

Read more here

Key takeaways from my 1st AI Webinar

igitalgenius

  • Hosted by Ruben @ Microsoft (Bucuresti), with
    Titus, Growth Manager @ DigitalGenius — Human+AI for Customer Service (San Francisco) & Cosmin — Data Science & Machine Learning developer, CEO of Clusterr.io (Timisoara)
  • Artificial Intelligence = “(…) the study of methods for making computers behave intelligently. Roughly speaking, a computer is intelligent to the extent that it does the right thing rather than the wrong thing. (…) AI includes tasks such as learning, reasoning, planning, perception, language understanding, and robotics.”
  • AI is not new, it has been around since 1955, with the first definition being proposed by Arthur Samuel
  • Machine Learning = “(…) the branch of AI that explores ways to get computers to improve their performance based on experience” — same source as AI
  • Examples of practical applications of Artificial Intelligence: playing board games and card games, answering simple questions, assembling complex objects, translating text from one language to another, recognizing speech, recognizing many kinds of objects in images, and driving a car under most “normal” driving conditions, fraudulent credit-card transactions or evaluating credit applications.
  • We’re now at the point where we have good enough data, good enough computing power (GPUs) & good enough algorithms to be able to produce usable neural networks and practical applications

Read the rest here, including the part where I talk about DigitalGenius & deep learning as a practical application of Artificial Intelligence for Customer Service

Artificial Intelligence – the Hottest Topic of 2017

ai20172017 has just started and already there’s a lot of voices in the market placing Artificial Intelligence at the top of predictions and reports from Forrester Research, Gartner, Tractica and venture capitalists alike.

In one GeekWire piece, three of the five venture capitalists quoted about 2017 trends mentioned AI on their list. That’s remarkable for an industry that has not yet reached maturity but has demonstrated it is ready for widespread adoption. 2017 is likely to be the year we see significant uptake in practical applications for artificial intelligence.

We are after all in a perfect storm of data, computing power and algorithms that fuel these applications both at startup and at corporate level. And I’m not talking about the all knowing AI, but something way more practical:

The promise of artificial intelligence is ubiquitous and often portrayed in Hollywood as a calculating robo-nemesis, disguised as a friend or personal assistant (just see Her, exMachina, and Westworld). Yet, there are few areas better suited for an AI-powered transformation than enterprise & business functions.

Mikhail Naumov, President & CSO at DigitalGenius – Human+AI Customer Service

As a bonus, Udemy is offering their AI/ML course at a 95% discount, an easy way to get in on the machine learning growth wave.

Save the Date – Top 5 2017 Growth Conferences

We’re running out of 2016 and if you haven’t done it yet, it’s a good time to put some dates in the calendar for your personal development. Being a great growth manager means you have to be on top of your game with both marketing, business development, management and operations. And that’s beyond your company’s industry.

growth-managers

Every year, things evolve very fast, so even if you keep up with the news, you need to get a boost by going to at least 5 events. This will not only give you an edge when it comes to info and case studies, but it is also a great way to network with peers and develop professional relationships with likeminded individuals.

Startup Grind – Global Conference

WHEN – February 21-22
WHERE – Silicon Valley – Fox Theater | Redwood City

“These are our people” – Sam Altman, Y Combinator, plus with 3,000 founders and investors, more than 40 keynote and fireside sessions, and over 50 exhibiting startups, this is Startup Grind’s largest event ever.

GrowCo

WHEN – May 8-10
WHERE – New Orleans, Louisiana, USA

Join like-minded entrepreneurs, business leaders, bestselling authors and headliners straight out of the pages of Inc., for three days of ideas, inspiration and insights, networking and learning, and proven strategies to help your company grow and thrive.

Traction Conference

WHEN – May 31 – June 1
WHERE – Vancouver, Canada

Traction brings founders and growth experts from tech unicorns including LinkedIn, Dropbox, Pinterest, Zillow, Hootsuite, Marketo, Groupon, HubSpot, AngelList and more to teach startups distribution strategies and tactics to get, keep and grow customers and revenue at scale.

CONTENT MARKETING WORLD CONFERENCE AND EXPO

WHEN – September 5-8
WHERE – Cleveland, Ohio USA, Huntington Convention Center of Cleveland

Over 80 sessions and workshops presented by the leading brand marketers from around the world covering strategy, integration, measurement

TechCrunch Disrupt 2017

WHEN – September
WHERE – San Francisco, California

It is the world’s leading authority in debuting revolutionary startups, introducing game-changing technologies and discussing what’s top of mind for the tech industry’s key innovators.

As 2017 kicks in and more conferences are announced, I’ll update this list with dates and places, so keep an eye out for this post.

What’s your shortlist for 2017?

Image Source